Build your in clinical dietetics.


Courses that empower current and future dietitians.

If you are a nutrition student looking to build your clinical knowledge before starting a dietetic internship, an intern embarking on your first clinical rotation, a graduate studying for the credentialing exam, an entry-level dietitian seeking to gain clinical skills, or any nutrition professional making the jump into the clinical world, you’re in the right place.

Join our tribe of happy and empowered students across the U.S. and beyond. The Nutrition Support Skills course has helped current and future dietitians thrive in Denver CO, Salem MA, Washington D.C., Sacramento CA, Seattle WA, Los Angeles CA, Philadelphia PA, El Paso TX, New York City, Ontario Canada, and Abu Dhabi. 

Brooke
Washington, D.C.
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I am a long-term care RD and I was in desperate need of a comprehensive course to get me up to speed on nutrition support after transitioning from my previous role as a WIC RD. At the start of my position, I had only 2 days of training before I was expected to manage a building with more than 10 tube feeders on my own. I found it difficult to find resources that covered the basics of nutrition support. Edge Nutrition was truly a godsend. It was an interesting and informative course that gave me the brush up I needed to be successful in my role. I am feeling empowered & confident in managing my TPN and EN patients after completing this course. I highly recommend it!
Meghan
Denver, CO
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I truly couldn't recommend Edge Clinical Nutrition more. I used this course to resharpen many of the clinical skills that had dulled since I completed my internship to make me a more competitive candidate for the clinical roles I was applying for. I am certain it helped me land a job as a clinical RD since I was asked about how I kept on top of my clinical skills and I specifically mentioned Edge Clinical Nutrition—a course created and taught by an ICU dietitian! I found the lectures on tube feeding so useful I have watched them twice. The content is engaging, informative, and empowering. The flow and structure of the modules, study materials, and lectures is well thought out and executed and the binder is full of useful materials and lots of encouragement from its creator, Sara. There are topical and helpful real life anecdotes with a good dose of humor throughout. Overall, it was challenging, educational, and I found it to be incredibly valuable in helping me achieve my goal of becoming a clinical RD! I will refer back to many of the resources and references provided for years to come.
Mai
Sacramento, CA
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"Taking Edge Clinical was one of the best decisions I've ever made. I took the course right before starting my first job as a clinical dietitian and it has helped me immensely. The course provided me with confidence and knowledge I couldn't have obtained just from my internship. Sara is also great at explaining each concept, her explanations were detailed and easy to follow. I cannot recommend this course enough for those who are looking to become a clinical dietitian or is a dietetic intern."
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Clinical preceptors say 50% of their students are under-prepared.

don't be one of them.

Nutrition Support Competency Questions

Does every diabetic patient need a diabetic formula? What types of renal formulas are available? What is a peptide-based formula? What are the pros and cons of concentrated formulas? These and many more questions are answered in the Nutrition Support Skills course. Best of all, I break down enteral nutrition calculations into simple, straightforward lessons so even if you’re not a math whiz, you will quickly become proficient at busting out a tube feeding order. 

If the gut works, use it. Sounds simple enough, but indications and contraindications for parenteral nutrition are often confusing. I dedicate several modules of the Nutrition Support Skills course to parenteral nutrition and delve into all the details of PPN, TPN and intravenous access. 

This is a loaded question. The short answer is maybe and the long answer is seriously complicated. I explain it all in the Nutrition Support Skills course. 

It’s no surprise that fiber is my favorite topic. This functional little nutrient (or is fiber a non-nutrient?) is so crucial, but can be dangerous for some patients at some points in critical illness. A thorough understanding of the benefits of fiber and the situations where we need to use caution is so important for the nutrition professional.